To safeguard the health and well-being of our entire community, we need to approach the challenges of this academic year together. All members of the MIT community who come to campus must follow the guidance and processes outlined in Health & Testing and Campus Access.


Though it will be quite different from a usual semester on campus, MIT is excited for the semester to begin. As some members of our community prepare to return to campus, the below FAQ offer guidance from across MIT.

Faculty and departments across MIT have worked throughout the summer to create and develop MIT-quality remote learning experiences. They are backed up by the pedagogical expertise of our Teaching and Learning Lab team, by the digital learning expertise of the Office of Open Learning, and by Digital Learning Lab fellows in many departments.

The full schedule of courses, including an indication of those that will be taught online and those with in-person elements, is available on the MIT Subject Listing & Schedule website.

Pre-registration for all continuing students opened on Monday, July 20. The deadline to complete pre-registration is Friday, August 14. The deadline for continuing students to select preferences for fall CI-H/CI-HW subjects was Friday, July 31.

Many current graduate students resumed their research work on campus in June, following rigorous public health rules and protocols. In terms of academics, graduate students can expect a combination of online and in-person instruction.

We know graduate students need much more information to make decisions about the fall, including whether coming to MIT physically is the best option. Because graduate programs vary so much in their length, nature, and need for campus facilities, fall plans will also differ sharply by program. Graduate students can expect to hear directly from their department or program about plans for the fall 2020 term.

You can learn more about MIT’s research ramp-up on the Office of the Vice President for Research website.

Registration Day for fall 2020 will take place on Monday, August 31, with classes for all students starting Tuesday, September 1. The semester will consist of fourteen calendar weeks, plus a four-day reading period:

  • The first week of classes (September 1-7), will be delivered remotely to enable returning students to test for Covid-19 and to quarantine.
  • Selected in-person classes will be conducted on campus beginning Tuesday, September 8.
  • Thanksgiving break will begin on Saturday, November 21, and will continue through Sunday, November 29. Undergraduates living on campus will be expected to depart for the remainder of the semester the weekend before Thanksgiving.
  • Classes will resume remotely for all graduate and undergraduate students on Monday, November 30, and continue through the last day of classes on Wednesday, December 9.
  • Final exams will follow a four-day reading period. All exams will be remote and will take place December 14-18.


See the academic calendar for additional details.

Our current plan is for IAP 2021 to be remote, though there may be some variations by program.

We are committed to ensuring undergraduate students have the opportunity to progress to on-time degree completion. Students should contact their academic advisor and department-based program administrators and officers if they have questions and/or if they require individualized support.

Undergraduates complete two major terms (fall and spring) in each year (first-year, sophomore, etc.) and then advance to the next year. After six semesters, a student is considered a senior for as long as it takes to graduate.

Yes. UROP is an integral part of an MIT education, and the Institute will make on-campus and remote UROP and other experiential learning opportunities available to undergraduate students in fall 2020 and spring 2021. Undergraduates who live on campus in the fall may participate in in-person UROPs if the research project meets all safety and public health requirements, can be conducted within the confines of MIT’s limited campus space constraints, and has approval from the faculty sponsor/PI. Remote UROPs will also be an option for students living on and off campus. More details about UROPs and other experiential learning opportunities can be found in the cost of attendance section.

No. Following our careful approach to managing community health, only those students who live on campus this fall will have access to campus for any reason. Undergraduate students living off campus will not be permitted to enter campus buildings.

On Friday, July 17, 2020, the Academic Policy and Regulations Team (APART)  announced a decision on the grading system that will be in effect for the fall semester.

For the fall semester, a letter grading system with extra flexibility will be in effect with the following key features:

  • Awarded grades include, A, B, C, D/NE, and F/NE.
  • NE indicates that no record will appear on the external transcript.
  • Students assigned a grade of D/NE will have the option of electing to accept a grade of D, since that may be desired in order to fulfill a requirement for graduation.
  • Students may elect to have one subject graded PE/NE in the fall semester.
  • First-year undergraduate students will be graded on the normal P/NR (pass/no record) basis for all subjects in the fall semester.
  • Safety nets with regard to grading and other measures to mitigate the effects of the pandemic will also be put into place.


Learn more about our grading policy

For MIT students 
MIT undergraduates will be allowed to cross-register for remote classes at Harvard and Wellesley during the fall term. Students should review the instructions and deadlines specific to each institution.

For non-MIT students
Cross-registration opportunities will be available during the fall semester for remote classes only. Instructors will also have the discretion to refuse cross-registration requests if they cause an undue burden on class availability and capacity.

For more information, visit the Registrar’s Office website.

Student Support Services and GradSupport has virtualized academic support resources for all students, whether they live on or off campus. These online resources will remain available throughout the academic year.

For students living on campus, as is customary, house teams – composed of heads of house in all on-campus houses, and area directors and graduate resident assistants in undergraduate houses – will be in each residence hall to provide support to their residents.

Student Support Services has assembled a list of wellness promotion resources, which includes online programs through DAPER, Community Wellness, MIT Medical, MindHandHeart, and more.

We are working on innovative strategies for delivering a special MIT first-year experience. First-year students will receive more information from the Office of the First Year (OFY) about upcoming events such as:

  • Virtual academic sessions to help incoming students choose fall classes.
  • Virtual academic sessions for parents.
  • Virtual office hours and one-on-one meetings.

Seniors can decide to live off campus but, if they do so, they will lose access to in-person instruction and on-campus activities and facilities.

Students who will be remote in fall 2020 will have many options for virtual programming. In addition to UROP, the PKG Center, MISTI, the Innovation Initiative, and others will offer remote program options in the fall. MIT has also developed guidance on remote making to help students make things safely while away from MIT’s campus.

All undergraduates, remote or on campus, will have the opportunity for a paid UROP, teaching opportunity, or public service opportunity through the PKG Center.

  • These experiential learning opportunities will be available to every undergraduate student through programs such as UROP, MISTI, PKG, Open Learning, or Sandbox, and will offer a stipend of up to $1,900.
  • This opportunity is guaranteed is for one semester, but that does not prevent students from earning more in that semester or engaging in more than one experiential learning opportunity.


Undergraduates who live on campus in the fall may take advantage of in-person UROPs if the research project meets all safety and public health requirements, can be conducted within the confines of MIT’s limited campus space constraints, and has approval from the faculty sponsor/PI. Remote UROPs will also be an option for students living on or off campus.

MIT wants to ensure all students can continue their academic programs via remote learning, both on and off campus. As it did last spring, MIT will loan Wi-Fi hotspots and computing equipment including laptops to those who need them. And, 24/7 technical support by phone or email is available to all.

Additionally, to support collaboration and small group problem solving that can be critical to many aspects of student learning and community building, MIT will loan a cellular-enabled Apple iPad and Apple Pencil to any undergraduate student or graduate TA who does not already have one or who wishes to upgrade their own equipment. This equipment will be available to all enrolled students, on or off campus. We encourage students to take advantage of this program, as many faculty will be relying on students having this equipment as well as laptops.

Career Advising & Professional Development (CAPD) is available to meet remotely or by phone and is offering virtual programs all semester, including the Virtual Career Fair, currently planned for the week of September 21 – 25.

Visit the CAPD site for more details, and get more information on CAPD resources.

Fourth-year undergraduates admitted to an MEng degree program during their senior year will continue to be considered fourth-year (senior) undergraduates for the purposes of all Covid-19 related policies, including housing, dining, access to campus, financial aid, grading, etc. They will be considered graduate students in their fifth year.

The registrar will reclassify all students in this situation as juniors for the spring term, meaning they will have the opportunity to study on campus in the spring 2021 term.

All students who arrive on campus are required to be tested at MIT Medical upon arrival. See the Covid Apps site for the latest information on testing times. If you arrive outside of testing hours, you should go directly to your assigned building and complete testing as soon as possible the next day. Your key will not be issued until Covid-19 testing at MIT Medical is complete.

After arriving on campus, you are expected to self-quarantine for 14 days or until you receive a second negative test at MIT Medical. Subsequent testing can take place a minimum of 5–7 days after arrival. Complete details about move-in, testing, and the new Massachusetts Traveler Form are available in the Student Life Campus Guide.

All incoming students must also complete the Student Medical Report Form, with no exceptions. If students fail to meet the deadline for submitting this form, their registration status will be placed on hold.

Students will also be required have a flu shot during the 2020-21 academic year. Exceptions will be made for religious or medical reasons only.

No. Rather than requiring students to quarantine before arriving, MIT Medical will test students returning to campus upon arrival. After arriving on campus, you are expected to self-quarantine for 14 days or until you receive a second negative test at MIT Medical. Subsequent testing can take place a minimum of 5–7 days after arrival.

Students do not need to schedule an appointment if they need to be tested when returning to campus. MIT Medical has walk-in testing available for returning students. See the Covid Apps site for the latest information on testing times.

Results are typically available within 24 hours.

MIT will begin by testing students residing on campus twice per week and will adjust this protocol as necessary. MIT Medical will share more details as workflows and policies are determined.

A student’s test results are protected medical information. Only the individual student and MIT Medical will have access to the test results.

If a student receives a positive Covid-19 test, they will be notified by a clinician from MIT Medical.

Any student residing on campus who tests positive for Covid-19 will have the full support and dedicated resources of the MIT community. Campus partners, including staff from MIT Medical and the CARE Team, have developed a comprehensive approach to supporting residents diagnosed with Covid-19 until they fully recover.

Two types of isolation space will be made available for residents in undergraduate and graduate housing should they test positive for Covid-19: an on-campus central location in a residence hall, and distributed locations in some halls where there is suitable space. Isolation spaces on campus are intended to meet the needs of those students who are living on campus.

Undergraduate students living in residence halls with designated isolation spaces will self-isolate in those areas. Undergraduate students living in residence halls that do not have distributed isolation spaces available in their building will isolate in a separate residential facility. All students who are isolating will receive support from MIT Medical, DSL, and their residential life team.

Graduate students living on campus may isolate in their private apartments if they live in efficiencies, one-bedrooms, or two-bedroom units in family housing. Graduate students residing in on-campus dormitory-style housing or multi-occupant units may be relocated to designated isolation areas in their building or to another campus location.

In order to ensure that move-in can happen while maintaining physical distancing, students will receive designated move-in days and times. To help ensure a smooth move-in process, you must arrive at your designated time.

Some undergraduate students may be invited to move in on Saturday, August 29, and some on Sunday, August 30. You will receive additional information about the move-in process and timing in August.

Some graduate students have already returned to campus. Additional August move-in dates are planned and will be confirmed with individual graduate students.

The Office of the First Year (OFY) is planning to host a virtual orientation for the Class of 2024. Incoming students have already been paired with orientation leaders, and MIT is planning for an exceptional first year. Orientation sessions will include academic planning, ASEs, parent programs, class unity events, student life topics, UROPs, and others. These programs will build on the existing outreach already underway.

The Orientation student schedule will be available via the Guidebook mobile app after August 1. If students have any questions, email the Orientation Office, or call 617-253-6772. We are available 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

The graduate student orientation team, composed of leaders from the Graduate Student Council (GSC), Division of Student Life (DSL), Office of Graduate Education (OGE) and Office of the Vice Chancellor (OVC), is working to develop virtualized programming to help new graduate students acclimate to MIT. These efforts, which including organizing informational, academic, and social events, have already begun and will continue in the coming months. Additionally, departments will communicate directly with their students about department-specific programming.

To eliminate the possibility of transmission and infection during games and matches, MIT will not participate in athletic competitions during the fall 2020 season. Institutions around the country in Division III have announced similar decisions.

A final decision about winter sports has not been made yet. Winter sports athletes and coaches should be aware that, if the winter season does in fact move forward, it would begin no earlier than January 1, 2021. Decisions about winter and spring varsity sports will be made in accordance with guidance from federal, state, and local health authorities, as well as any scheduling directives from the New England Women’s and Men’s Athletic Conference (NEWMAC), the Patriot League (women’s openweight crew), and the United Volleyball Conference (men’s volleyball).

Club sports and intramurals will be available in the fall semester only to MIT students (both undergraduate and graduate) who are invited back to campus. All related travel and competition has been canceled for the fall semester. Visit the Club Sports and Intramurals websites for updated information.

Select DAPER outdoor facilities are open, and some indoor facilities will open this fall. The DAPER outdoor facilities are open to members of the MIT community who have been approved to reside or work on campus for the fall 2020 semester. Check-in is required for use of these facilities, which include: 

  • Steinbrenner Stadium 
  • Roberts Field 
  • Sherie and Don (1961) Track 
  • Jack Barry Field 
  • DuPont Tennis Courts
  • Wood Sailing Pavilion

Visit the DAPER website for more details about hours and access.

DAPER will offer live and recorded online options for students to complete the coursework needed to fulfill their Physical Education and Wellness General Institute Requirement, including the swim test.

DAPER will continue to provide a wide variety of virtual programming and activities for the MIT community throughout the academic year, including virtual group exercise classes.

Student Support Services assembled a list of wellness promotion resources that includes online programs through DAPER, Community Wellness, MIT Medical, MindHandHeart, and more.

For a detailed FAQ about MIT’s 2020-21 cost of attendance and financial aid policies, visit the Student Financial Services website.

MIT will not increase tuition at the planned 3.8 percent this year. Tuition will remain at the 2019-20 rate, and students will not be charged the student life fee for the 2020-21 academic year.

MIT is taking the following steps:

Tuition

Tuition will remain at the 2019–20 rate. There will not be the planned 3.8 percent increase this year.

Student life fee

No one will be charged a student life fee for the coming academic year regardless of whether you are on campus or not.

Dining allowance

Typically, our dining allowance is tied to the most expensive meal plan, originally set at $3,160 per semester for the 2020–21 school year. This year, there will only be one 14-week meal plan that will cost $2,468. To defray the cost, all undergraduates living on campus will receive a Covid subsidy of $984 for the fall term meal plan, bringing the total cost down to $1,484. So that students can supplement the 14-meals-per-week plan, the dining allowance offered in the financial aid award calculation will be $2,500 per semester, giving students additional financial flexibility and choice.

We expect that students living at home will have reduced food costs, and we are offering an allowance of half the on-campus rate.

Books, supplies, and personal expenses

There are standard allowances for books, supplies, and personal expenses, set at $1,506 per semester, for both on-campus and off-campus students.

Travel

For the on-campus semester, we are offering students an allowance to support one round trip to and from campus. We are not offering an allowance for travel during the semester off campus.

Covid-era grant

In recognition that this year there will be financial uncertainties for many families, all undergraduates enrolled for the full academic year 2020-21 will receive a new, one-time grant of $5,000, which will appear as a credit on your student account. 

Depending on whether or not you have any outstanding balance, the credit in your account will appear in one of three ways:

  • If you have an outstanding balance of $5,000 or more, your bill will be reduced by that amount. 
  • If your bill is greater than $0 but less than $5,000, your bill will be zeroed out and you will receive the remainder as a refund. 
  • If your bill is already $0, you will receive the full $5,000 as a refund.

For those receiving financial aid, the grant will appear in your financial aid award letter and on the fall bill (where it will appear for everyone), which were scheduled to go out respectively on July 20 and August 10.

Guaranteed employment or research opportunity

All undergraduates, remote or on campus, will have the opportunity for a paid UROP, teaching opportunity, or public service opportunity through the PKG Center, and will offer a stipend of up to $1,900. Available experiential learning opportunities are run through programs such as UROP, MISTI, PKG, Open Learning, or Sandbox. The guarantee is for one semester but does not prevent students from earning more in that semester or engaging in more than one experiential learning opportunity.

Technology

To promote collaboration and small group problem solving for our enrolled students, whether remote or on campus, MIT will loan a cellular-enabled Apple iPad and Apple Pencil to any undergraduate student who does not already have one (or who wishes to upgrade relative to what they own).

For more details and to indicate whether or not you wish to enroll, fill out this form. Furthermore, MIT will once again loan WiFi hotspots and computing equipment, including laptops, to those who need them. Visit the Computing Equipment Loaner Program website for more information. 24/7 technical support by phone or email will also be available to all.

In order to get awards to students quickly, we calculated aid based on the expectation that students will spend one semester on campus and one semester off campus. However, we know that student situations may vary, and we may adjust your award up or down accordingly.

Accessing MIT’s campus requires students to live on campus this fall. MIT’s Off-Campus Housing Office has developed guidance to help you sublet, assign, or terminate your lease. For more details and contact information, visit the Division of Student Life fall 2020 website.

We understand that some students may be unable to sublet and therefore may have additional costs if moving on campus while maintaining a lease for three months. The Covid-era grant is intended to address a range of financial uncertainties our students will face, including this situation.

Yes. Students who have a student contribution as part of their financial aid award generally meet that expectation through term-time work. We recognize that it might be harder to find opportunities, so MIT is developing research, public service, and teaching positions to help fill the gaps. To that end, every undergraduate student will be guaranteed a paid research or employment opportunity this academic year.

These experiential learning opportunities will be available to every undergraduate student, whether remote or in person, through programs such as UROP, UTOP, MISTI, PKG, Open Learning, or Sandbox.

You can also reduce your work expectations with outside scholarships, including the Federal Pell Grant.

Yes. The Student Financial Services (SFS) team is working to revise each award to reflect the change in tuition, housing, and other allowances, as well as the addition of the Covid-era grant.

Revised financial aid awards were sent to students in July. More information about award adjustments can be found on the Student Financial Services website.

Many families may find themselves in a new circumstance, and we are here to work with you during this challenging time. If you think that you may need to appeal your financial aid award, you are welcome to do so.

We will consider changes to overall income if there has been a 10 percent or larger reduction in your family income. You will need to fill out the estimated income appeal form and send it to us with your appeal.

You should reach out to your financial aid counselor directly, and they will work with you to review your appeal.

Yes. Families can always apply for aid at any time during their four years at MIT. For more information, see the Student Financial Services undergraduate students page.

Students in this situation should contact Student Financial Services so their financial aid counselor can learn more about the extenuating circumstances they may be facing. The counselor will work with you and possibly other offices such as Student Support and Wellbeing, Housing and Residential Services, and the International Students Office, among others, to determine potential next steps.

We know that financial stress can affect individual well-being and academic success. MIT can provide assistance to graduate students experiencing financial hardships arising from a variety of circumstances. The following awards are not a loan and do not need to be repaid. Graduate students should contact Student Financial Services if they wish to learn more about their eligibility for the following assistance programs:

  • MIT Grant for Graduate Students with Children
  • Graduate Student Short-Term Emergency Fund
  • Doctoral Long-term Financial Hardship Funding

All high-touch surfaces (handrails, elevator buttons, door handles, etc.) in all common areas on campus (main corridors, main lobbies, elevators, restrooms) are now cleaned and disinfected twice daily, Monday through Friday, and once on Saturday. Also note that:

  • Additional cleaning is conducted in the Stata student street and the Infinite Corridor throughout the day, Monday through Friday.
  • If an individual in an MIT building is suspected of having Covid-19 (is being tested or is awaiting results) or has been confirmed positive, the Custodial Services team will arrange for a deep cleaning and disinfection of the spaces around the individual’s workstation, and/or other spaces in the building as necessary.
  • The Office of the Associate Provost has been in communication with landlords and property managers of leased buildings occupied by MIT staff and has confirmed that they are utilizing enhanced cleaning and hygiene protocols, have established building access and circulation protocols, and have posted signage encouraging healthy practices.

Whenever possible, individual users should clean the high-touch surfaces they interact with during the day before and after use (i.e., restroom touch points, elevator buttons, conference room tables and chairs, printer and copier buttons, etc.). MIT is working to make cleaning materials available for this purpose. Remember to always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after contacting any high-touch surfaces.

Buildings will be phased into the new cleaning protocols in alignment with the schedule of research ramp-up.

Yes. If you are working in a lab on campus, you need to review the detailed protocols provided on the Covid-19 page of the Office of the Vice President for Research. You should also review the PPE policy statement from EHS.

MIT will provide hand sanitizer at the entrances of MIT buildings. Check with your DLC’s administrative officer about what other cleaning supplies are available for staff in your area.

MIT Custodial Services staff will empty trash and vacuum in your personal office or cubicle, but they will not touch your desk, chair, work surfaces, keyboards, monitors, etc. Whenever possible, you should wipe down high-touch surfaces in your personal workspace. Check with your DLC’s administrative officer about what other cleaning supplies are available for staff in your area. 

Yes. Whenever possible, you should wipe down high-touch surfaces in your personal workspace (desk, chair, work surfaces, keyboards, monitors, phones, cabinet and drawer handles, light fixtures and switches, staplers and tape dispensers, etc.), at a minimum when you arrive and when you leave. Check with your DLC’s administrative officer to learn what cleaning supplies are available for staff in your area and determine the best approach for keeping your personal workspace clean.

Custodial Services staff will clean and disinfect elevators once a day, Monday through Friday, with an additional cleaning on Saturday. High-touch surfaces in elevators will be cleaned and disinfected twice a day by custodians, Monday through Friday.

  • Whenever possible, individual users should wipe down high-touch surfaces before and after use. MIT is working to make cleaning materials available for this purpose.
  • If possible, avoid using elevators and use the stairs instead. If you do use an elevator, be aware of new maximum occupancy rules posted and wait for others to exit the elevator before entering.
  • Floor decals will be installed to show individuals where to stand while in the elevator or while waiting for the elevator.

Custodial Services staff will clean and disinfect restrooms twice a day, Monday through Friday, with an additional cleaning on Saturday. 

  • Be sure to wash your hands upon entry and wash hands again upon exit.
  • Take care to ensure that the toilet has been flushed completely before you leave the stall.
  • Be mindful of physical distancing in all spaces, including restrooms, and try not to overcrowd a restroom. Any updates to DLC practices for restroom capacity will be announced as needed.

Custodial Services staff will clean and disinfect conference rooms once a day, Monday through Friday, with an additional cleaning on Saturday. Try to avoid using conference rooms. If possible, meetings should be held via videoconferencing rather than in person, even if everyone is in the same building.

If you do use a conference room, use the following guidelines:

  • Whenever possible, individual users should clean the conference room before and after they use the room, wiping down high-touch surfaces (the table, chair arms, light switches, equipment like touch screens, phones, and whiteboard markers, etc.) before and after use. Check with your DLC’s administrative officer about availability of cleaning supplies in your area for this purpose.
  • Be aware of each conference room’s new lowered capacity limit.
  • Users must wear face coverings and maintain a standard 6-foot distance between each other.
  • When you leave the conference room, leave the doors open to increase ventilation. 
  • Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after using a conference room.

If an individual in an MIT building is suspected of having Covid-19 (is being tested or is awaiting results) or has been confirmed positive, the MIT Custodial Services team will arrange for a deep cleaning and disinfection of the spaces around the individual’s workstation (and/or other spaces in the building as necessary). Per CDC guidance, anyone who had close contact with that individual (within six feet) for 15 minutes or more will be asked to quarantine for 14 days. If you have symptoms, call the MIT Medical Covid hotline: 617-253-4865.

MIT shuttle vehicles are cleaned once a day using a Covid-19 approved fogging process along with enhanced cleaning procedures. In addition, shuttle drivers clean high-touch surfaces at every shift change. 

Each shuttle will be equipped with signage advising passengers to:

  • Maintain a physical distance of at least six feet from each other.
  • Fill seats starting in the back and progressing toward the front.
  • Disembark from the front seats first (then progress toward the back).

Seat decals have been posted to prevent passengers from using some seats and guide them to seats that are at a safe distance from each other. Shuttle drivers are wearing face coverings and gloves, and all passengers must wear face coverings. Plastic shields are being installed between the drivers and passengers, and hand sanitizer is available in each vehicle. Remember to always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after contacting high-touch surfaces, including surfaces in shuttles.

On behalf of our MIT units located in leased spaces, the Office of the Associate Provost is in communication with landlords and property managers to review their re-entry guidelines and preparations, including confirmation of:

  • Enhanced cleaning and hygiene protocols, including disinfection of high-touch surfaces and areas.
  • New protocols for building access, circulation, and entry/exit points.
  • Signage for wayfinding and to explain health/safety procedures.

MIT has created and is distributing and/or installing a range of signage (door signs, wall signs, table tents, floor decals, AV screen images, flyers, etc.) with messaging that reinforces the health and safety protocols for each specific area or location. The Department of Facilities is installing signs in common areas (such as main entrance doors, elevators, restrooms, outside spaces) and is providing signage templates to DLCs. Each DLC is responsible for posting clear signage in areas the DLC manages. View the Covid-19 signage template page to download and print signs.

MIT is posting signs inside buildings and throughout outside spaces that strongly encourage individuals to maintain physical distancing, wear face coverings, refrain from gathering in groups, etc. The Office of Campus Planning is evaluating the possibility of installing directional (one-way) signage in corridors and stairwells to provide guidance on walking paths while maintaining safe, accessible routes.

Each DLC is responsible for determining maximum occupancy in that DLC’s common spaces such as conference rooms, kitchens, break rooms, etc., based to some extent on the size of the common area. The current policy for bathroom occupancy across campus is one person per bathroom. The Department of Facilities is installing signs in common areas (such as main entrance doors, elevators, restrooms, outside spaces) and is providing signage templates to DLCs. Each DLC is responsible for posting clear signage in areas the DLC manages. Visit the Covid signage template page to download and print signs.

Undergraduate students invited to return to campus and graduate students who will be on campus will need to read, sign, and follow an agreement to comply with public health expectations and MIT Covid-19 policies. It will contain information about MIT’s new Covid-19 policies and protocols as well as how the Institute will address non-compliance. Students’ emergency contacts will also need to read and electronically sign an acknowledgement of this agreement. See more about the agreement for undergraduates and graduate students

In addition to the agreement, MIT has campus-wide Covid-19 policies and protocols. Current Covid-19 housing policies were put in place in March and have been updated for the fall semester. Students living in undergraduate and graduate residence halls can view undergraduate policies and graduate policies for more information.

All residence hall policies also apply to graduate spouses, partners, and families who live on campus.

Yes. To meet the public safety and health objectives of the Institute’s fall return plan, undergraduate students who are invited to return to campus in fall 2020 must live on campus if they want access to campus.

To better enable physical distancing and to protect the health of individual students and residential communities, doubles, triples, and quads in MIT’s undergraduate residence halls will be converted to singles.

However, rates will be set at the 2020-21 double-room rate for each house, and the total cost will be prorated based on the shortened time on campus. All housing and dining costs will be included in students’ financial aid awards.

Students invited to live on campus during fall 2020 were asked to complete the fall 2020 Housing Intent & Preference Form within the MyHousing portal to share their building and living preferences. In turn, Housing and Residential Services (HRS) used this information to assign students to a residence hall based on their top-ranked preferences. Building assignments were shared with returning students at the end of July. HRS worked collaboratively with room assignment chairs (RACs) in each house to develop a process for this fall’s room assignments. After receiving living preference and group selection information from students, HRS shared details with RACs to facilitate individual room assignments for each residence hall in coordination with the house team. Confirmed room assignments are scheduled to be shared with returning students by the middle of August.

Yes, students who continue to meet the SHARP program criteria may submit a request to remain on campus. Detail on this process will be released later in the fall.

As in the spring and summer, FSILGs will be closed to undergraduate residents for the fall 2020 semester. Graduate resident advisors and graduate students who have been living in an FSILG may continue to do so. MIT will work with FSILG alumni to subsidize costs for house operations so they can resume operations when it is safe to do so.

The FSILG Office will continue to work virtually with the FSILG governing councils, chapter presidents, and ILG students to advance their organizational programs and initiatives. FSILG student leaders are already planning for remote recruitment programs that will be complemented by in-person programs when all students can return to campus.

Accessing MIT’s campus requires students to live on campus this fall. MIT’s Off-Campus Housing Office has put together helpful directions on how you can potentially sublet, assign, or terminate your lease. For more details, and contact information, visit the Division of Student Life Fall 2020 website.

We understand that some students may be unable to sublet and therefore may have additional costs if moving on campus while maintaining a lease for three months. The Covid-era grant is intended to address a range of financial uncertainties our students will face, including this situation.

Out of an abundance of caution and following safe food-handling and enhanced cleaning guidelines from the CDC and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, all undergraduates living on campus will be required to purchase a 14-meal-per-week meal plan. To defray the cost, all undergraduates living on campus will receive a Covid subsidy of $984 for the fall term meal plan, bringing the total cost of $2,468 down to $1,484. So that students can supplement the 14-meals-per-week plan, the dining allowance offered in the financial aid award calculation will be $2,500 per semester, giving students additional financial flexibility and choice.

TechMart, MIT’s at-cost grocery, will relocate to the Student Center in August. At this time, Dunkin’ and the Cambridge Grill are the only retail eateries expected to reopen in the building. The retail eatery Pacific Street Cafe is also expected to reopen. Dining facilities and retail eateries are available only to community members granted access to specific campus buildings.

Dining service for undergraduates will be a combination of take-out and sit-down, depending on availability of seating in the residential dining halls, the Student Center’s Lobdell Dining Hall, and some house common spaces. Students who take their meals in dining halls will be required to maintain proper physical distancing and wear face coverings except while at their tables. Lobdell will serve breakfast and lunch Monday through Friday, and an east-side daytime dining location may open. Dinner will be served in the five residential dining halls seven nights a week, with brunch service on weekends. Where necessary, dinner and brunch will be delivered and served from a common space to cook-for-yourself communities. Additional serving locations and times may be added as necessary.

Graduate students on the meal plan may eat breakfast and lunch Monday through Friday in Lobdell. Additional serving locations and times may be added as necessary.

Undergraduate residence kitchens remain closed for the fall, except in special circumstances when reservation of a designated “country kitchen” is required (such as baking a birthday cake). Houses will implement their own reservation systems. Kitchen utensils must be cleaned thoroughly after use, and all surfaces must be wiped down with cleaning supplies provided by the house team.

The International Students Office and the International Scholars Office are providing up-to-date information concerning travel restrictions and visas.

MIT continues to follow developments concerning the U.S. Department of State and the continued suspension of visa services at most U.S. embassies and consulates abroad. In addition, we continue to be in contact with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (USDHS) regarding clarification of policies concerning international student study in the fall 2020 term.

Once the U.S. Department of State resumes visa services at U.S. embassies and consulates abroad, we understand that visa processing may not allow students who have been invited to return to campus to arrive at MIT by the start of the fall term. Visa restrictions from presidential proclamations that apply to entry to the U.S. from certain countries may also delay arrival. Students will be able to begin their fall term coursework remotely until they secure their visas and meet requirements to arrive to campus. 

The MIT International Students Office will work with each student eligible to enter the U.S. to coordinate the necessary visa documentation for arrival to campus, even if there will be delays in arriving by the start of the fall 2020 semester or if arrival to campus will be in the spring 2021 semester. 

International students with questions may contact their ISO advisor as well as consult additional guidance to be posted on the ISO Updates webpage.

As a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, MIT may have students with paid appointments (UROPs, RAs, TAs, fellows, etc.) in foreign countries. MIT has developed a framework for allowing eligible students to proceed with anticipated fall appointments from outside the US. In general, the framework consists of a list of general eligibility criteria, submission of an intake form, review by a team of representatives from several MIT offices, and decision by the dean and/or the vice president for research. For more information, view guidance on remote student appointments performed outside the U.S.

This fall, we have prioritized the return of seniors, as they have the least amount of time remaining to satisfy degree requirements, and being on campus will allow them to complete capstone subjects, research, and theses.

As a matter of equity, we want to enable every student to have the ability to spend at least one term on campus. It is our intention to open campus for all first-years, sophomores, and juniors in the spring. If public health conditions change fundamentally – e.g., if an effective vaccine becomes widely available – we may also offer seniors the opportunity to stay on campus for the spring term.

Yes. The Student Housing Assistance Review Process (SHARP) was designed to help two groups of students:

  • Rising sophomores and juniors who wished to request on-campus housing during the fall 2020 semester.
  • Students, including seniors, who experienced significant hardship and who believed they absolutely could not live at home and could not live on campus.

As a general rule, incoming first-year students were not considered for on-campus housing except in cases of significant hardship. This is because there will be no on-campus orientation in the fall, and first-years won’t have the benefit of all of the social interaction and on-campus support that is part of a typical MIT fall. As a result, first-year students would experience challenges trying to navigate MIT on their own.

For more information about eligibility criteria, helpful resources, deadlines, and other aspects of the process, please visit the SHARP website. Note: SHARP for fall 2020 closed on July 28, 2020.

The Admissions Office handles gap year requests. Incoming first-year undergraduate students had until July 27, 2020 to indicate if they wished to defer their enrollment (that is, take a “gap year”) for the 2020-21 academic year. After this date, a gap year request may not be granted.

As in previous years, MIT will not allow incoming first-year undergraduate students to defer only for the fall semester, as this could result in students being off-cycle to meet certain requirements.

Yes, provided students made their request to the Admissions Office by Monday, July 27, 2020, and abide by established policies for first-year undergraduate deferrals. Requests can be made to gapyear@mit.edu.

Upper-level students (sophomores, juniors, and seniors) will be able to follow the typical process for requesting a leave of absence and filling out the appropriate form. If you were invited to campus and are undecided about living on campus or taking a leave of absence, you should still submit an application for on-campus housing. Students invited to campus who did not submit their preferences by Monday, July 27 will not be guaranteed housing for fall 2020.

As in prior years, students who take a leave of absence are not guaranteed on-campus housing upon return. Housing & Residential Services makes every effort to place undergraduates in on-campus housing, but it is important for students to factor into their decision-making process that on-campus housing availability will likely be extremely constrained in future years.

Different degree programs require different amounts of in-person and online instruction, and on-campus TA and RA requirements vary significantly. Before making a decision about deferring enrollment as a newly admitted graduate student or taking time away from the Institute as a continuing student, students should consult with their department administrator and faculty supervisor to discuss whether their work and studies can be performed in person or remotely.

More information can be found in Graduate Policies & Procedures, and additional support can be provided by GradSupport in the Office of Graduate Education (OGE).

MIT announced on May 20, 2020 that as part of the research ramp-up, invited graduate students could participate in a safe, gradual return to campus research. President Reif’s June 17 letter reiterated this guidance.

As the ramp-up progresses following outlined guidelines and department-approved plans, PIs and supervisors will be allowed to invite additional graduate students whose research requires use of on-campus facilities to access certain buildings.

Graduate students invited to conduct research on campus must complete the requirements for returning to campus and obtain a valid Covid Pass to access the buildings designated by their PI/supervisor. These requirements include:

  • Signing a form acknowledging risks of return and requirements to be on campus.
  • Completing the required EHS training.
  • Completing a daily health attestation.

Each Covid Pass is good for 24 hours and requires a daily health attestation for building admittance.

Each center is operating under abbreviated hours:

  • TCC Linc: 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • TCC Koch: 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • TCC Stata: 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
  • TCC Eastgate: 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

MIT offers several child care support options.

In addition, MIT is pleased to offer a calendar year 2020 Covid-19 supplemental child care subsidy. The subsidy program is available to benefits-eligible employees, postdoctoral associates, and postdoctoral fellows who have dependent children ages 0-12. Employees may request a $2,000 subsidy for each dependent child, up to a maximum of three children per household.

The CARES Act extended the list of health care FSA qualified expenses to include additional over-the-counter medications and products.

On April 3, 2020, MIT Benefits communicated the extension of the 2019 reimbursement window for health care and dependent care FSA claims from April 30, 2020 to May 31, 2020. Due to new regulations, that reimbursement window has now been extended to 60 days after the end of the federal government’s declaration of a national pandemic or another time period as designated by the IRS. As of now, no end date for the national pandemic has been declared.

For the 2020 plan year and future plan years, the carryover amount for the health care FSA is $550 (the carryover for the 2019 plan year is $500).

Recent regulations allow employees to revoke an election, make a new election, or decrease or increase an existing health care or dependent care FSA election on a prospective basis only. Employees cannot reduce their election to less than what has already been contributed and/or has been reimbursed. For example, if during open enrollment, you made an annual health care FSA election of $2,000 and as of June 1, 2020 you have contributed $900 and have been reimbursed $1,300, you cannot reduce your health care FSA election to less than $1,300.

To reduce or cancel your health care or dependent care FSA, you must complete and submit the 2020 FSA Change Form to MIT Benefits.

Learn more about flexible spending accounts.

The HR Covid-19 FAQ page will guide you to information about these areas.

Many of us can relate to feelings of anxiety and fear about what the future might hold. We are increasingly concerned about our own health and the health of our loved ones, while also adjusting to new ways of living and working. MIT has resources to help you combat stress and loneliness during this challenging and confusing time.

  • MyLife Services – MIT’s employee support program – has created a Covid-19 Resource Page with specific information and resources for managing work, caregiving responsibilities, and one’s own mental health and well-being during this unique time. 
  • Employees may also contact MyLife Services for individualized support. Counseling and stress management sessions can be conducted via phone, video conference, or text message.

Employees can also visit MyStress Tools, which offers free access to an online suite of webinars, podcasts, audio, and articles focused on stress management.

MIT has extended the suspension of MIT-related international travel for students, faculty, postdocs, and staff until further notice. MIT-related domestic travel also remains suspended for most travelers. See the MIT travel policy for full details.

Most visitors external to the MIT community will not be permitted on campus this fall, except those who are essential for MIT to conduct critical research and education activities and the vital services that support those endeavors. Campus visitor exception policies for fall 2020 were released on July 27, 2020.

One of the great joys of being an MIT community member is the vibrancy of campus life. Given the current pandemic, however, students should know that life at MIT will be very different than it was at the start of the 2019 fall semester. Though this is disappointing for all of us, the measures described below are intended to protect the health and safety of MIT community members and our neighbors.

The foundation of our approach to reopening is regular testing. Upon arrival to campus, students residing on campus will be tested for Covid-19 by MIT Medical, followed by a seven-day self-quarantine and then a second test. As an extra precaution, the first week of classes will be conducted entirely online to accommodate the seven-day self-quarantine period. Students who are on campus will also be tested regularly for Covid-19 during the fall.

Only undergraduate students who live on campus and graduate students granted access as part of their research/teaching assistantships or to take in-person classes will have access to MIT facilities (with certain access restrictions) and in-person instruction. While staff and student leaders are working to allow for some level of on-campus student engagement, student activity groups or clubs – including dance, theater, and musical groups – are prohibited from meeting in person.

To allow for physical distancing, undergraduate students will be housed one per room each in residence halls. All fraternity, sorority, and independent living groups (FSILGs) will be closed. To further limit the potential for viral spread, residence halls, FSILGs, and student groups may not hold events on campus or in the FSILGs.

MIT and each residence hall will have policies about Covid-19 related conduct, but in all cases face coverings are to be worn outside a student’s room and in academic buildings, labs, and other shared spaces.

So everyone understands their role in protecting themselves and each other, students returning to campus will be required to:

  • Complete public health education.
  • Sign an agreement to live in MIT housing and have access to campus.
  • Attest to their wellness online before entering MIT facilities.
  • Follow physical distancing and other safety requirements and follow policies that have been put in place due to Covid-19.

Under certain circumstances, students will be asked to share information about contacts with other people on and off campus.

Shared kitchens are potential hotspots for spreading the virus. As a result, everyday cooking in undergraduate residence hall floor and country kitchens is prohibited, and all undergraduates on campus will be required to sign up for a meal plan. To lighten the financial impact of this necessary precaution, the meal plan cost will be reduced by more than 40 percent with a special Covid-19 subsidy. Residential dining halls and other dining facilities will be open with limited seating and modified services.

Because access to MIT facilities will be closely managed, everyone on campus will be required to carry their MIT ID at all times. Most buildings will be accessible through only one staffed access point. Working spaces may be reconfigured and schedules changed to allow for adequate physical distancing. Cleaning protocols across campus will be stepped up.

Unfortunately, MIT varsity sports teams will not compete this fall. On-campus offerings for both club sports and intramurals will be reviewed based on student demographics and health and safety guidelines. DAPER will provide more information to all affected by these cancellations directly. For students living on campus, indoor fitness facilities will open in September with changes to their layout, occupancy numbers, and policies to limit the potential spread of Covid-19. Some outdoor fitness facilities have reopened already. As with all other MIT facilities, access to DAPER facilities will be limited only to students authorized to be on campus.

The customary undergraduate and graduate student support resources will be available online and by phone to all students on and off campus. Any student who is invited back to campus and has concerns about returning should reach out to one of the many support resources available to MIT students.

All members of the MIT community will be required to wear a face covering. The face covering will need to cover the nose and mouth and should not contain a vent or valve. The Division of Student Life (DSL) will provide students with masks when they move into their residence halls.

Face coverings are required in all indoor public spaces at MIT, including lobbies, hallways, elevators, and stairs, as well as outdoors when you cannot maintain a distance of six feet from other people. Face coverings do not need to be worn in the privacy of your room. During the summer months (through September 22, 2020), face coverings may be removed temporarily when you are outdoors and able to maintain a physical distance of at least six feet from other people.

Review the PPE policy statement for guidelines and best practices.

Students living on campus should expect that access to campus spaces will be limited, determined by academic, research, and student life operations. You must meet all requirements for testing, public health training, and self-health attestations to maintain access to campus spaces. If you are living off campus, you will not have access to campus facilities or in-person instruction.

At this time, public health and MIT policies prohibit student gatherings. Student Organizations, Leadership and Engagement (SOLE) and the Campus Activities Complex, in consultation with student leaders from the Association of Student Activities, the Graduate Student Council, and the Undergraduate Association, are working on an approach that will enable student groups to function in ways that follow public health guidelines and MIT policies.

Student groups may be able to request access to their offices and storage to get specific items needed for their operations. However, the spaces may not be used for meetings or events. The process for requesting access to student group offices and storage will be managed through the Engage system.

With regard to music, dance, and theatrical events, research suggests that the risk of spreading the virus may be elevated when people sing, speak loudly, or engage in close-contact physical activity like dancing. As a result, no music, dance, or theatrical performances will be allowed on campus.

No. Social gatherings and parties are not permitted on campus.

MIT is not permitting Institute-sponsored travel and strongly discourages community members from non-essential international and domestic travel. This fall, we believe it is essential that students limit their travel – including weekend trips home – to prevent the transmission of Covid-19 to and from our community. The virus’s trajectory is highly unpredictable, so travel guidance and restrictions are subject to change without warning.

Students who choose to work on or off campus should take appropriate precautions, including wearing a face covering and practicing physical distancing. Any student exposed to Covid-19 at a workplace is required to follow all MIT isolation policies and protocols.

Individuals working on campus will need to be tested at MIT Medical. See the Covid Apps site for the latest information on testing times.

  • People living in MIT residence halls will need to test at least twice weekly; tests should be no more frequent than every 3-4 days.
  • Non-resident students, faculty, and staff who are on campus 4 days or more per week will need to test at least twice weekly.
  • Non-resident students, faculty, and staff who are on campus 1-3 days per week will need to test at least once per week.
  • Anyone accessing campus less frequently will need a test on file within the past 7 days to gain access to campus. If it has been more than 7 days since the last test, the person must be tested before access is granted and should plan in advance for this.
  • Note: One-time access is intended for individuals who have to come in for a short period of time on one day. They will not require a test. However, one-time access should not be granted to an individual in your DLC who has to be on campus multiple days in a row, or more often than once a month.

Yes. The current campus policy is that face coverings are required on campus. During the summer months (through September 22, 2020), you may remove your face covering temporarily when you are outdoors and able to maintain a physical distance of at least six feet from other people. You can also remove your face covering when consuming food or drink.

More information is available on the PPE policy statement from EHS. 

Supplies of face coverings are available from MIT Police in Lobby 7 (MIT ID required) and may also be available at other locations on campus.

Contact your administrative officer to find out more.

Yes, you can provide your own face covering. Follow CDC guidelines in terms of making a face covering, putting it on and taking it off, and keeping it clean.

If you are comfortable doing so, raise your concern directly with your colleague. Otherwise, you may consider informing their manager, or talking to the HR representative in your DLC or to your human resources officer.

If you wish to raise the issue anonymously, you may contact the MIT Hotline.

Exceptions to the face covering requirement include:

  • Anyone with a disability, medical condition, or trouble breathing whose healthcare professional has documented a recommendation against wearing a mask.
  • When you are consuming food or drink

Check with your DLC for area-specific exceptions (such as situations where a face covering is a safety hazard).

Cloth face coverings must be worn at all times on campus. During the summer months (through September 22, 2020), you may remove your face covering temporarily when you are outdoors and able to maintain a physical distance of at least six feet from other people. You can also remove your face covering when consuming food or drink. 

Check with your area’s leadership to determine what the policy is for inside your building or lab. 

MIT Medical performs contact tracing on all known cases of Covid-19 in the MIT community. You will be notified immediately if you are known to be potentially at risk. 

Your DLC may decide to organize the kitchen or break room according to physical distance criteria and may have marked the floor with tape to show where people can sit while still maintaining physical distance. Because eating requires us to remove our face coverings or masks, eating together with coworkers should be avoided or, if necessary, done with especially great care.

If you do choose to eat in a kitchen or break room at the same time as another person, it is recommended that you both strive to maintain physical distance.

Other recommended practices include: 

  • Washing hands before and after eating.
  • Checking for signage indicating a maximum capacity for the room, and observing capacity limits.
  • If possible, cleaning high-touch areas before and after using them (“clean in” and “clean out”), including table and counter surfaces, chairs, etc. 
  • Bringing your own food, utensils, mugs, dishes, coffee, and drink. Vending machines will not be available. 
  • Avoiding high-touch items like magazines or newspapers.
  • No shared food or drinks. Shared water dispensers are discouraged, and staff are encouraged to bring their own water. 
  • Microwaves and refrigerators should be used with great care. If possible, clean handles and buttons before and after use. Some DLCs may have more stringent policies for using food-related appliances.
  • Minimizing talking (cellphone or otherwise) during eating time.
  • Don’t leave food or crumbs behind. Clean up after you have finished eating.
  • Don’t leave any items or trash behind, and don’t clean anything left behind by others.

TechMart, MIT’s at-cost grocery, will relocate to the Student Center in August. At this time, Dunkin’ and the Cambridge Grill are the only retail eateries expected to reopen in the building. Retail eateries across campus expected to reopen include Pacific Street Cafe and 100 Main Marketplace in Sloan. Dining facilities and retail eateries are available only to community members granted access to specific campus buildings. The City of Cambridge is also maintaining this list of local open businesses.

Based on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Commonwealth of MA guidance, it is clear that the most effective ways to limit the spread of Covid-19 are the safety measures our community is already taking:

  • Practice physical distancing.
  • Wear face coverings.
  • Wash hands often for a minimum of 20 seconds.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently
  • Limit the number of people on campus.
  • Isolate people who become infected.

According to the CDC workplace FAQ, “The risk of spreading the virus that causes Covid-19 through ventilation systems has not been studied, but is likely low.” 

A dedicated team from MIT Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) and Facilities Engineering is reviewing ventilation strategies for each building. At a minimum, all installed ventilation systems will be operated as they are designed to maintain indoor environmental air quality.

In buildings that are reopening, MIT is taking the following steps:

  • Evaluate readiness for building occupancy by inspection of central air handling units, life safety systems, and other infrastructure systems following the prolonged facility shutdown.
  • Ensure that exhaust fans in restrooms are functional and operating. Windows will also be opened in restrooms to increase outdoor air ventilation where possible, weather and window type permitting.
  • Where it’s feasible and practical, improve system filtration to the highest level achievable (unit type permitting), increase outdoor air ventilation (unit type permitting), and/or run air systems for longer hours.

Elevators are designed to stay ventilated at all times, so the air change rate is not a problem even if the elevator has been closed. Some of the more modern elevators on campus can be programmed to have doors open when parked, and MIT is in the process of programming these elevators as an additional measure.

Yes, as long as you have an MIT ID card. Through the end of 2020, most MIT parking facilities on the Cambridge campus are free of charge and available to all MIT ID cardholders. All MIT ID cards have been activated to allow access to most MIT lots, including gated lots and garages, regardless of whether the individual is a current parking account holder.

Off-campus lots will continue to only be available to individuals with permission for those lots. Please note that parking rules continue to apply, and signage regarding reserved spaces must be observed. In addition, the Medical, Ford (E19), and off-campus leased lots are not included in this expanded program.

See the Facilities parking pages for more information.

Yes, the shuttles are running. Due to the reduced number of people on campus, several of the shuttle services have transitioned to reduced schedules. MIT is monitoring shuttle usage and will ramp up the schedules as needed.

More information is available on the Facilities shuttles pages.

If your building has an indoor bike storage room, it continues to be available to anyone approved for access to the building. Use the storage room as responsibly as possible, only touching surfaces as necessary and wiping down surfaces before and after you come in contact with them. Ask your administrative officer for cleaning supplies as needed. Wash your hands thoroughly after leaving the storage room. 

MIT Mail Services will provide services as follows and will assess needs daily and adapt as Institute recommendations require:

  • Collection times on campus are currently limited to once daily, at noontime, Monday through Friday. Mail staff will not pick up from collection boxes in buildings that are closed. See additional information on the Mail Services page.
  • Currently, Mail Services holds packages and materials for any areas that are closed and not available for deliveries.
  • At the moment, international mail and package delivery disruptions and delays are common due to Covid-19. Visit the USPS site for information for specific countries.

Repair and Maintenance staff continue to conduct scheduled and emergency work on campus. Services may be requested via Atlas Service Requests.

The Atlas Service Center continues to operate and is prepared to help the community navigate MIT, although most services are now offered remotely. Specific changes are:

  • MIT IDs usually picked up at the center will continue to be mailed to home addresses. For questions, email atlascenter@mit.edu.
  • Student and employee commuter rail and LinkPasses usually picked up at the center or distributed via interoffice mail will continue to be mailed to home addresses or distributed via house managers. View details including actions to take if your home address has recently changed.
  • Starting June 29, in-person I-9 verifications have resumed. An appointment must be scheduled ahead of time. View details at the I-9 Process at MIT website.
  • IT support and services are available by phone and email; currently, on-site walk-in and repair service is not available. For more information, visit IS&T Covid-19 Updates.
  • Passport photos can be taken in person at the Atlas Center but must be scheduled ahead of time. Email atlascenter@mit.edu for an appointment.
  • Due to a recent change in Massachusetts law, notary services can now be provided remotely. To schedule notary service, visit the Atlas website.

All other services will remain remote.

The Department of Facilities has created a suite of signs. You can download, print, and install these signs in your area. Visit the Covid signage template page to download files. Contact the Covid signage team with any questions.